Book Review Monday

Yeah, okay, I’m totally late, but life has been crazily busy lately and I was out of town. Here’s what I’ve read lately:

The Others, by Thomas Tryon

Book Description: Entranced and terrified, the reader of The Other is swept up in the life of a Connecticut country town in the thirties-and in the fearful mysteries that slowly darken and overwhelm it.

Originally published in 1971, The Other is one of the most influential horror novels ever written. Its impeccable recreation of small-town life and its skillful handling of the theme of personality transference between thirteen-year-old twins led to widespread critical acclaim for the novel, which was successfully filmed from Thomas Tryon’s own screenplay.

My review: The Other was creepy, but not the creepiest thing I’ve ever read. There is a big plot twist that took me awhile to figure out, and I love it when a book isn’t obvious. Also, it’s about sociopathic children, and really what is scarier than that? I’ve actually been warned never to read We Need To Talk About Kevin until after I have all my children and I’m fairly certain they’re not serial killers.

The language is a little old, and I found I had to concentrate more than I was able to on this one. I need to stick to easy books right now, I guess? It really is a good, dark, complex mystery, very gothic and well done. It reminded me a lot of We Have Always Lived In the Castle.

 

The Raven Boys, by Maggie Stiefvater

Book Description: “There are only two reasons a non-seer would see a spirit on St. Mark’s Eve,” Neeve said. “Either you’re his true love . . . or you killed him.”

It is freezing in the churchyard, even before the dead arrive.

Every year, Blue Sargent stands next to her clairvoyant mother as the soon-to-be dead walk past. Blue herself never sees them—not until this year, when a boy emerges from the dark and speaks directly to her.

His name is Gansey, and Blue soon discovers that he is a rich student at Aglionby, the local private school. Blue has a policy of staying away from Aglionby boys. Known as Raven Boys, they can only mean trouble.

But Blue is drawn to Gansey, in a way she can’t entirely explain. He has it all—family money, good looks, devoted friends—but he’s looking for much more than that. He is on a quest that has encompassed three other Raven Boys: Adam, the scholarship student who resents all the privilege around him; Ronan, the fierce soul who ranges from anger to despair; and Noah, the taciturn watcher of the four, who notices many things but says very little.

For as long as she can remember, Blue has been warned that she will cause her true love to die. She never thought this would be a problem. But now, as her life becomes caught up in the strange and sinister world of the Raven Boys, she’s not so sure anymore.

My review: I really enjoyed this book – it’s the type that kind of grabs you right by the throat right away. And there’s nothing like a page turner to overcome a little life distraction. When I first read the jacket, I thought, oh, another Cinderella story, poor girl falls in love with rich guy. Throw in some paranormal activity. When this didn’t happen, and the story continued to defy my expectations, I became more and more interested.

The end was a little anticlimactic – obviously the set up is for a trilogy or series. But, I will be going out to find the next one of the series, and that is saying a lot. My fingers are crossed that this doesn’t become a love triangle. However, Stiefvater has gone against the mould so far, so I am so willing to see where else she is going to take this.

Word of the day:

Paucity: smallness of quantity; scarcity; scantiness: a country with a paucity of resources

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s